“Dismantle the Papacy”? “Pope Francis” may be an ally in this effort.

I would see this as a positive, though incomplete, “development”. But they could not “dismantle” enough for my liking. And there is no papal repentance in this model. “The leaders of the “school of Bologna” have a very ambitious new project in the works: a history of the movement for Christian unity aimed at a …

Aquinas was the Problem; the Reformation was the Solution

As a former long-time Roman Catholic (from birth to about 18 and then from ages 23 to 38), I devoutly sought to understand and live according to the Roman Catholic faith. When I read through the New Testament at age 18, I didn’t find Roman Catholicism there; what I found changed the course of my …

The Jacob Aitken Reading List: “the ePistemologian’s Progress”

A portion of it, anyway. I found this list on Facebook – it appears to be a list of “things to read” before the year 2020. He says: This list was taken from Craig and Moreland (2003): 627-639 [Philosophical Foundations for a Christian Worldview]. It’s a specialized list of technical works in philosophy and theology. …

The End of High Orthodoxy

High orthodoxy, then, is the era of the full and final development of Protestant system prior to the great changes in philosophical and scientific perspective that would, in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, utterly recast theological system into new forms. There is perhaps some justification in dividing seventeenth-century orthodoxy into two phases. The first is …

The Breadth Of The Reformed Orthodox Phenomenon

The Calvinist philosopher Paul Helm has recently published a brief review or commentary on Oliver Crisp’s “Deviant Calvinism” on the discussion between “freedom of the will” and “state of grace”. He states the issue: “An attempt will be made to show not that there are two rival metaphysical views of human freedom side by side …

Debate and Polemic, Within and Without the “High Orthodox”

I didn’t grow up Reformed, and so some of the distinctions that are made in and among Reformed churches are difficult for me to contextualize. This section is somewhat long, but it moves quickly, and I found it very helpful in sorting out “what all the discussions were about” during the Reformed “High Orthodox” period …

Doctrine and Method in the Era of High Orthodoxy (ca. 1640–1685–1725)

1. General characteristics. The period following 1640 and extending, in two phases, into the beginning of the eighteenth century can be called the period of high orthodoxy, defined most clearly by further changes in the style of dogmatics. The architectonic clarity of early orthodoxy is replaced to a certain extent or at least put to …

“The Chief Task is to Assess the Protestant Adjustment of Traditional Scholastic Categories in the Light of The Reformation”

A Clearer Understanding of the Meaning of the Reformation Itself This entry concludes the section of Richard Muller’s work under the heading, “Doctrine and Method in the Era of Early Orthodoxy (ca. 1565-1618-1640)”. What’s been most notable for me, in publishing selections from Muller, is to notice the continuities of thought through the Reformation period. …

Trajectories in Aristotelianism and Rationalism in Early Reformed Orthodoxy

I am often asked, “at a time when there is a flood of people leaving Roman Catholicism, why does it seem that so many intellectuals seem to be moving in the opposite direction?” There are a number of reasons for this – some Anglicans are converting because of the rampant liberalism and decline in morality …

New: Dr. Carl Trueman Lectures: “The Reformation”

Westminster Theological Seminary (WTS) has just recently released a new series of iTunesU Lectures on The Reformation. The upload date on the series was 9/29/14, so this is pretty recent. For anyone who’s interested in learning more on the Reformation at a seminary level, this is a great—and free—resource that you can take advantage of.