Tag Archives: Alister McGrath

“The Catholic Reformation”

Desiderius Erasmus, who first compiled the Greek New Testament in 1516, was probably one of THE most influential figures leading to the Reformation, in several ways. The circumstance of his birth is one way you may not have heard about. … Continue reading

Posted in Alister McGrath, John Bugay, Roman Catholicism | Tagged , , , | 2 Comments

Putting Peter Lombard Into Perspective

Moreso than Anselm, Peter Lombard (c. 1100-1160) was influential in defining the shape of subsequent discussions of the Doctrine of God: B. The High Scholastic Doctrine of God: Theologians of the Thirteenth Century Once scholastic theology has been arranged in … Continue reading

Posted in Doctrine of God, John Bugay, Post-Reformation Reformed Dogmatics | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

“Divine Revelation” Part 3: Methodological Considerations When Discussing “the Church” and “the mind of the Church”

Andrew, I wanted to get back to your comment from February 7, 2014 at 2:06 pm. You were kind enough to put some thought into summarizing a response there to questions I had asked, and I believe here that we … Continue reading

Posted in Alister McGrath, development of doctrine, earliest church, Ecclesiology, Hermeneutics, Jaroslav Pelikan, Roman Catholic Ecclesiology | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 9 Comments

The Crafting of the 4th Century Roman Church, Doctrine, and Papacy

There is no question that there were “bishops” in Rome, likely beginning in the late second or early third centuries. But these were not “bishops” as we would understand them today. Roger Collins, in his work “Keepers of the Keys … Continue reading

Posted in "Petrine Succession", 2013 Papal Conclave, Church History, development of the papacy, Papal Conclaves, Roman Catholic Ecclesiology, Roman Catholicism | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,