Paul and the proper place of unity

At the end of a recent posting, I noted that Irenaeus wrote that “the church at Rome was ‘founded and set up by the two most glorious apostles Peter and Paul.’ (Against Heresies, 3.3.2).” It is clear from 1 Corinthians that Peter and Paul crossed paths from time to time, and they did so, among …

The Catholic Historical Method

It’s important to understand, when Catholics and Protestants approach a given topic, they approach things in different ways. In comments to a recent posting on the question of the origin of the Bible, one Catholic writer prefaced his statement this way: “Both sides, yours and mine both can be accused of question begging.” The dishonesty …

Thumbs up or thumbs down on Rome?

One commenter said: The way you write, I guess, seems to me to reveal a near certainty concerning the falsity of Catholic Doctrine. It seems as though you know beyond a shadow of a doubt that Catholicism simply couldn’t be true. And you’re willing to hang everything on that confidence. Too often, an argument is …

A Positive View of Christian Foundations

Jesus said, “Everyone then who hears these words of mine and does them will be like a wise man who built his house on the rock. And the rain fell, and the floods came, and the winds blew and beat on that house, but it did not fall, because it had been founded on the …

A Summary Reminder on Newman

I published the following information several months ago, but I wanted to bring this to the top for some of the folks who have been asking some questions about Newman and his theory of the development of doctrine. Dr. William Witt, an Anglican, wrote a bit about Newman and development, and here he defines here …

Newman’s historical concession

A commenter wrote: I was not aware that Newman concedes the point that there was no bishop in Rome during that period and I am surprised to hear that! Could you possibly reference that for me? I’m working with the 1989 edition, published by the University of Notre Dame Press. Newman (p. 12) in discussing …

Newman’s theory of development shattered

In Newman’s “Essay,” at the end of Chapter 3, Section 2, he suggests that “the one essential question is whether the recognized organ of teaching, the Church herself, acting through Pope or Council as the oracle of heaven, has ever contradicted her own enunciations. If so, the hypothesis which I am advocating is at once …

A word about method

At another place where I am a frequent commenter, the host, Jason Stellman, suggests that we should ask the following question: Should we Protestants, whether Lutheran or Calvinistic, be playing the antiquity game in the first place? Or should we be more consistetly Sola Scriptura? I absolutely believe that Protestants should be in the business …