Richard Muller’s Operating Assumptions

Among other things, Muller is going to look for, and find, continuities among the Medieval church, the Reformation, and the “Post-Reformation” Reformed writers. An operating assumption of the work has consistently been that the theology of the Reformers is not utterly identical to the theology of their orthodox successors, and that continuity between the theologies …

How Reformed Scholasticism differed from Medieval Scholasticism

For the Orthodox Reformed writers working in the generations after the Reformation, “scholasticism” was a method of doing things, not an appropriation of earlier doctrines. These writers and theologians worked with the “broad brush” provided by the Reformers, as they sought to “establish … systematically the normative, catholic character of institutionalized Protestantism.” The term scholasticism …

Moving forward while retaining ties to the past

I’m working through Richard Muller’s “Post-Reformation Reformed Dogmatics”. That’s a daunting title, to be sure, but given how these several generations of theologians (from say, 1550 to 1750) worked to codify the theologies of the Reformation, they were probably some of the best Christian thinkers in the history of the church. It will pay dividends …