Whose Community? Which Interpretation?

In the past few posts I have attempted to offer a critical engagement with postmodernism, yet one that also seeks to appreciate legitimate moves within the system.  In this post I will review Merold Westphal’s Whose Community? Which Interpretation? (Baker Academic). Thesis:  Westphal, following James K. A. Smith’s The Fall of Interpretation, argues that we should not seek …

Truth Stranger than it used to be (review)

(3 out of 5 stars) This book was one of the earliest salvos into the postmodern situation, at least from a semi-“conservative” Christian position.   The authors (hereafter MW) highlight the collapse of the “modern” project, examine the postmodern response, and then offer their own Christian response.   In terms of structure and outline, the …

A postmodern continuum

One of the most useless terms in lay apologetics is “postmodern.”  It usually means “someone different from me but I am not sure how.”  Or it means Brian McLaren.  Postmodernism as a critical literary and philosophical position is rarely distinguished from applications of postmodernism by hippie, angry, post-evangelicals.  Imagine a charted continuum.  I can’t do …

A clarification on absolute-claims

My recent posts on finitude was misread in thinking I held that “absolute knowledge” was impossible for humans.  That is not what I meant.  I was simply following traditional Reformed theology (see Muller) on the theologia unionis: The Christological problem follows the [epistemological issue]:  if the human nature of Jesus, as finite, is in capable …

Postmodern Theology and Renewal By Grace

Postmodern theology is diverse, ranging from “postliberal theology” to “deconstructive theology,” and trying to capture its fundamental tenets likely conflicts with what one even does (or can do) with such theology. But one might describe postmodern theology’s fundamental tenet as a recognition that one is ‘placed’ in an interpretive context (or community) and it is …